We The Arts: JUNETEENTH Celebration in Healdsburg

We The Arts: Civic Engagement Through Art is an ArtsEd4All project taking place from June 12 – July 4, 2022, in celebration of Civic Season 2022.

JUNETEENTH Celebration in the Healdsburg Plaza

Juneteenth is the African American celebration of liberation 2 years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. Soon after the end of the Civil War, black communities throughout the nation celebrated independence every June 19th with gatherings, delicious food, and of course good music. Healdsburg Jazz is proud to present a diverse range of music, art, culture and education in honor of this holiday, free to the public, in the Healdsburg Plaza.

FREE TO THE PUBLIC

Sunday, JUNE 19, 2022, 11 am – 4 pm,

Healdsburg Plaza, Healdsburg, CA

Healdsburg Jazz Festival 2022

https://healdsburgjazz.org/sunday-june-19/

Juneteenth Celebration in the Healdsburg Plaza with Willie Jones III Quintet, MJ’s Brass Boppers, the Curtis Family C-notes, poets Enid Pickett and Kamau Daáood, KCSM’s Greg Bridges, educational areas, vendors and more.

Presented in partnership with Healdsburg Community Services Department

Make a flag in the arts and crafts area in the plaza.

The Juneteenth Flag, a symbolic representation of the end of slavery in the United States — was created in 1997 by Ben Haith, the founder of the National Juneteenth Celebration Foundation (NJCF). In 2000, artist Lisa Jeanne Graf modified the flag to its present, modern-day design.

Flag Day is celebrated on June 14th.

While flags are everywhere and a part of daily life; most people don’t pause to unlock the rich history and ideas they represent.  With North American Vexillological Association (NAVA) and the community of knowledge it builds, members say “open, sesame” to reveal the wealth of symbols and stories behind flags.

Flags first developed in China, with the advent of silk, and spread across Asia to the Middle East, where crusaders brought them to Europe.  Beginning as markers on the battlefield, their use expanded to identification at sea, denoting who owned, taxed, and protected vessels.  Eventually they became the ultimate icon representing nations, peoples, sub-national and civic entities, organizations, military units, companies, and individuals.  Flag design began with heraldry, then spread its independent wings.  Even before flags, “vexilloids” served as earlier symbols of group affiliation—tribes, armies, clans—and the Romans’ battle standard, the vexillum, gave its name to “vexillology”, the study of flags.

Good Flag, Bad Flag – This 16-page booklet, compiled from the expert input of over 20 different vexillologists world-wide, has become a classic resource for flag design.

African American artists, including Faith Ringgold, Jean-Michel Basquiat, David Hammons and Gordon Parks have used the flag form in their art.

American Gothic, Washington, D.C.” Credit: Photograph by Gordon Parks.

FREE On Demand Online Film Screening

A Choice of Weapons: Inspired by Gordon Parks

A Choice of Weapons: Inspired by Gordon Parks explores the power of images in advancing racial, economic, and social equality as seen through the lens of Gordon Parks, one of America’s most trailblazing artists, and the generation of young photographers, filmmakers, and activists he inspired.

A Choice of Weapons: Inspired by Gordon Parks is a co-production of Kunhardt Films and HBO. Film for this screening provided by Kunhardt Film Foundation.

This film screening is presented by ArtsEd4All, in conjunction with this year’s #CivicSeason (from Juneteenth to July 4th). Please RSVP to receive a link and password enabling FREE unlimited access to the film via the virtual screening room from Monday, June 12, 2022 at 12:01 AM PST to Tuesday, July 4, 2022, 11:59 PM PST.

Juneteenth: A Celebration of Resilience

Juneteenth is a time to gather as a family, reflect on the past and look to the future. Discover ways to celebrate this African American cultural tradition of music, food and freedom.

Learn more about the historical legacy of Juneteenth and explore more objects related to emancipation in the National Museum of African American History & Culture’s collections. https://nmaahc.si.edu/juneteenth

The Emancipation Proclamation

Transcript of the Proclamation, January 1, 1863. By the President of the United States of America. https://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured-documents/emancipation-proclamation/transcript.html

‘What To The Slave Is The Fourth Of July?’: Descendants Read Frederick Douglass’ Speech | NPR

In the summer of 2020, the U.S. commemorated Independence Day amid nationwide protests for racial justice and systemic reforms in the wake of George Floyd’s death. That June, we asked five young descendants of Frederick Douglass to read and respond to excerpts of his famous speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”. It’s a powerful, historical text that reminds us of the ongoing work of liberation.

FEATURING (alphabetically) Douglass Washington Morris II, 20 (he/him) Isidore Dharma Douglass Skinner, 15 (they/their) Zoë Douglass Skinner, 12 (she/her) Alexa Anne Watson, 19 (she/her) Haley Rose Watson, 17 (she/her)

A text version of the full speech is available here.

“My Story, Your Book” – DFES Family Art Night 2

On Monday, January 27, 2020 at Family Art Night #2 with the Del Sol String Quartet, the families at Dianne Feinstein Elementary went on an “Imaginary Journey” with storytelling and bookmaking.

The quartet wove a musical thread though the evening, opening and closing the evening with composer Huang Ruo’s string quartet No. 3, “Calligraffitti.”

From “The Chinese Knew” by Tillie S. Pine and Joseph Levine, illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats, published in 1958. https://archive.org/details/chineseknew00pine

We also introduced author/illustrator Ezra Jack Keats and the annual Ezra Jack Keats Bookmaking project at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, encouraging students to try make their own books. We shared news about the ongoing Blake Mini Library Book Drive benefitting the Hamilton Families shelter program in the Tenderloin, and shared news of the upcoming Author’s Day at DFES. The families learned how to do traditional Chinese bookbinding Cheryl Ball and Cheryl Itamura of Book Arts Roadshow.

Thank you to Mara, Patrick, Angela, Cynthia and Chae for the helping hands and set up with the #meatlessmonday spread. Lion love to Dr. Zaki, the DFES PTA Board and all of the DFES families who supported this community evening of creativity.

This event was made possible by an Artist and Communities in Partnership – Creative Youth (ACIP-CY) grant from the San Francisco Arts Commission.

Dianne Feinstein ES Family Art Night #2 with The Del Sol String Quartet

DFES Family Art Night #2 — “MY STORY – YOUR BOOK”

Monday, January 27, 2020; 5:30pm – 7:00pm

Dianne Feinstein ES Multipurpose Room

The second of four DFES Family Art Nights with the Del Sol String Quartet’s Angel Island Project will explore the importance of storytelling and the written word through the art of bookmaking. Cheryl Ball and C.K. Itamura of Book Arts Roadshow will teach us how to make our own books, and The Del Sol String Quartet will play!

In celebration of the 8th annual Ezra Jack Keats Bookmaking Project, we’ll also consider the role that children’s books play in sharing the important stories and historical contributions of all Americans.

A light dinner is provided with the PTA meeting from 5:30pm – 6:00pm. 

Pictured from left to right: Traditional Chinese bookbinding, art from The Chinese Knew by Ezra Jack Keats (1958); art by Chris Sasaki from Paper Son: The Inspiring Story of Tyrus Wong: Immigrant and Artist (2019)

Thanks to an Artists and Communities in Partnership – Creative Youth Arts (ACIP-CY) grant from the San Francisco Arts Commission and the support of the Dianne Feinstein ES PTA, these family evenings with The Del Sol String Quartet and teaching artist Andi Wong will explore the history of Angel Island, capture positive cross-cultural stories and create opportunities for the school to collaborate and contribute a new work of art that will be shared at the Angel Island premiere.

“Your Wall is Our Canvas: The Angel Island Project” will bring the poems of Angel Island to life in the very space they were created. Composed by Huang Ruo, the 45-minute oratorio for string quartet and chamber choir will weave a story of immigration and discrimination of then and now. The premiere performances will occur at the Angel Island Immigration Station in October 2020.

This project is supported in part by the Hewlett Foundation 50 Arts Commissions. Additional funding has been provided by the Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation, the Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation, and the San Francisco Arts Commission.

“Honoring Our Ancestors” – DFES Family Art Night 1

The first DFES Family Art Night with the Del Sol String Quartet introduced the Angel Island Project, teaching artist Andi Wong and the members of the Del Sol String Quartet to the Dianne Feinstein ES community. The Del Sol String QuartetCharlton Lee (viola), Kathryn Bates (cello), Ben Kreith and Sam Weiser (violin) – got the evening off to a great start with a musical introduction. Everyone, adults and children, were invited to get up on their feet for an easy stroll around the room. Listening to the music, participants were invited to making contact, with smiles, head nods, touching feet, and secret handshakes in a traveling warm up to “G Song” by Terry Riley.

Andi offered a brief introduction to the history of Angel Island. Angel Island offers an important lesson on how stories and art have helped to carry historical information forward to the future. In 1970, Ranger Alexander Weiss re-discovered the poetry carved by immigrants into the walls of the Angel Island Immigration Station barracks. The poems were translated and preserved in the 1980 book, Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island, 1910-1940 by Mark Him Lai, Genny Lim and Judy Yung, and the Chinese-American community worked together to preserve and protect this important historical site for future generations of Americans.

Families conducted a four question oral history interview. Oral history is a field of study and a method of gathering, preserving and interpreting the voices and memories of people, communities, and participants in past events. Oral history is both the oldest type of historical inquiry, predating the written word, and one of the most modern, initiated with tape recorders in the 1940s and now using 21st-century digital technologies. Based on the responses, parents worked with their children to write a simple poem on the theme of family.

Resolute in her faith, 
watching the wine dark sea. Her face
to the wind. Loving God.
Black as Night, bright as Light, she stands.

The J-H Family remembers a powerful strong woman who baked a great sweet potato pie.

We sing the family song.
We speak out Spanish language.
We visit our family in El Salvador and call.

The P-B Family remembers their family's arrival in the USA

As Del Sol performed Tenebrae by Osvaldo Golijov, the children were invited to collaborate on work of art, an evening sky mural. Golijov’s composition finds hope and wonder in a world upended by war, when he visits the New York City planetarium with his five-year-old son, who sees the earth for the very first time — a “pale blue dot” in the vast cosmos.

In closing, we shared a wonderful opportunity to conduct an oral history interview. StoryCorps “The Great Thanksgiving Listen” is a national movement that empowers young people—and people of all ages—to create an oral history of the contemporary United States by recording an interview with an elder, mentor, friend, or someone they admire using the free StoryCorps App. Interviews become part of the StoryCorps Archive at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.

Thanks to Megan Wong and Patrick Wu for helping to set up our workshop materials (heavy-lifting those giant pumpkins donated by family farmer Todd Fong of Elk Grove) and serving our Thanksgiving-themed #meatlessmonday dinner. Lion love to Dr. Salwa Zaki, Rory McMahon for the tech support and DFES PTA Board support from Angela Rosoff, Cynthia Inaba and Chae Reed. Most of all, thanks to the DFES families who helped to make this first community evening of creativity a big success.

When the event was done, those who wanted a pumpkin were welcomed to take one home to enjoy. We brought the biggest of the giant pumpkins down to Pescadero to share with Dan Sudran, founder of Mission Science Workshop and the Community Science Workshop Network. Dan introduced us to his friend Gabriel, a valued team member of Puente, who knows a lot about bees and seeds.

The best way to keep going and growing is to share the learning with others!

This event was made possible by an Artist and Communities in Partnership – Creative Youth (ACIP-CY) grant from the San Francisco Arts Commission.

Dianne Feinstein ES Family Art Night #1 with The Del Sol String Quartet

“HONORING OUR STORIES – OUR ANCESTORS”

Monday, November 18, 2019; 5:30pm – 7:00pm

Dianne Feinstein ES Multipurpose Room

The Del Sol String Quartet: Ben Kreith, Charlton Lee, Kathryn Bates, Sam Weiser. photo: by Lenny Gonzalez

Thanks to an Artists and Communities in Partnership – Creative Youth Arts (ACIP-CY) grant from the San Francisco Arts Commission and the support of the Dianne Feinstein ES PTA, a series of four Family Art Nights have been planned with The Del Sol String Quartet and teaching artist Andi Wong. These family evenings will introduce the Del Sol String Quartet as musical neighbors who are ready to play well with others. Together, we will explore the history of Angel Island, capture positive cross-cultural stories and create opportunities for the school to collaborate and contribute a new work of art that will be shared at the Angel Island premiere.

Our first DFES Family Art Night will introduce THE ANGEL ISLAND PROJECT and the members of THE DEL SOL STRING QUARTET, who will play especially for us. Participants will learn how to conduct an oral history interview, and use the Story Corps app. Families will also collaborate on a work of art that honors our ancestors.

A suitcase filled with stories on Angel Island.

“Your Wall is Our Canvas: The Angel Island Project” will bring the poems of Angel Island to life in the very space they were created. Composed by Huang Ruo, the 45-minute oratorio for string quartet and chamber choir will weave a story of immigration and discrimination of then and now. The premiere performances will occur at the Angel Island Immigration Station in October 2020.

This project is supported in part by the Hewlett Foundation 50 Arts Commissions. Additional funding has been provided by the Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation, the Phyllis C. Wattis Foundation, and the San Francisco Arts Commission.

“Under the Sea” Art Night & Welcome Tea at Dianne Feinstein Elementary School

The DFES community is invited to ART NIGHT ~ Please join us and help to welcome new incoming Kindergarten families to Dianne Feinstein ES with an “UNDER THE SEA” WELCOME TEA! Around the school, you’ll find an OCEAN OF ART created by students working with art teachers Crystal Hermann, Sharon Collins, Scott Perry and Suzie Berndt.

Enjoy a nice cup of tea and treats and offer a neighborly hello to the incoming K families in the Octopus’ Garden in the lobby. Help to build a coral reef with Ms. Crystal in the Art Room! Swim on down to the MPR and enjoy fun activities for the whole family!

ALL TOGETHER NOW!

In the DFES MPR, you can learn more about the newest Mission Blue hope spot — your heart’s desire in your own backyard — with DOER Marine, quality maker of submarines! DOER, aka Deep Ocean Exploration and Research, was founded in 1992 by Dr. Sylvia Earle. Today, the DOER tradition is upheld by subsea specialists Liz Taylor and Ian Griffith.

We invite you to share your wild ideas of how to repurpose the giant steel case that transported DFES mascot Edwin the Panda across the Pacific from China with DOER!

Kid Speaks for Parks founder Robbie Bond and DFES Principal Chang hang loose with Edwin the Panda. During his May 8th presentation to the fourth and fifth graders at DFES, Robbie shared a quote from his mentor, master navigator Nainoa Thompson, “You can’t protect things that you don’t understand, and you won’t protect them, if you don’t care.” Robbie, who recently moved to Nevada from Hawaii, shared his love for the Green and Blues, and encourages all students who have all received an Every Kid in A Park pass to enjoy and protect their National Parks and National Monuments.

The Hawaiians have a saying, “He wa’a he moku, he moku he wa’a,” which translates as “the canoe is an island, and the island is a canoe.”

THE WAYFINDER is an immersive 360 film that follows the story of a real-life “Moana” – a young Hawaiian who dreams of sailing in the wake of her ancestors. As Kamai learns how to guide a canoe using the ancient art of wayfinding, she discovers tools that will help her guide the future of her islands – and navigate the voyage of her life. Catch a VR screening of The Wayfinder from from 5:00pm to 5:50pm in the MPR.

Filmmaker Gail Evenari founded Maiden Voyage Productions in 1994 with the production of Wayfinders: A Pacific Odyssey, an award-winning PBS documentary funded by National Endowment for the Humanities, which chronicles the history and renaissance of Polynesian voyaging and navigation. In 2012, MVP launched World Wise Adventures, introducing multicultural perspectives to teens through meaningful interactions with diverse global communities. World Wise Interactive combines Virtual Reality immersive experiences with an interactive curriculum to raise young people’s awareness of diverse cultures and critical global issues – inspire them to action. 

THE ALOHA UKE SQUAD is a ukulele ensemble bringing joy through music and the aloha spirit. We are thrilled that they are coming to play at Art Night. The Aloha Uke Squad sing-a-long takes place in the MPR, with brief introductions at 5:50pm and the singalong beginning at 6:00pm.

There’s something about the ukulele that just makes you smile. It makes you let your guard down. It brings out the child in all of us.” — Jake Shimabukuro

Download the Aloha Uke Squad JAM PACKET:

HAMILTUNES @ The SFUSD Arts Festival

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Hello, hello, hello…! 

Please join us for a HAMILTUNES Singalong at the SFUSD Arts Festival on Sunday, March 18, 10am – 11:30am, in Samsung Hall at the Asian Art Museum. Free and open to all students! Costumes welcomed and encouraged! Participants can get advance practice on all of their favorite songs by using the Hamilton Instrumentals tracks which are available on Apple MusicSpotify and YouTube. If you are a fan of the hit Broadway musical Hamilton, then you’ll wanna be in the room when HAMILTUNES happens! 

The San Francisco Unified School District proudly presents the SFUSD Arts Festival; a celebration of student creativity in visual, literary, media, and performing arts hosted by the Asian Art Museum in the Civic Center from March 14 to March 21, 2018. http://www.sfusdartsfestival.org/

This is an invitation for children in all of the SFUSD schools and their families and caretakers and people of all ages to have some fun while demonstrating their united belief that arts education opportunities are essential for all students.

Hamiltunes at the SFUSD Arts Festival

HAMILTUNES: AN AMERICAN SINGALONG

The producers of HAMILTON have authorized a free sing-along program for groups of fans everywhere to come together publicly and celebrate the musical. HAMILTON is the story of America’s Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, an immigrant from the West Indies who became George Washington’s right-hand man during the Revolutionary War, and was the new nation’s first Treasury Secretary. Featuring a score that blends hip-hop, jazz, blues, rap, R&B and Broadway, HAMILTON is the story of America then, told by America now.

HAMILTUNES: An American Singalong — with book, music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda, direction by Thomas Kail, choreography by Andy Blankenbuehler, music direction/orchestrations by Alex Lacamoire, Hamilton is based on Ron Chernow’s biography of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton. The musical won eleven 2016 Tony Awards including Best Musical, Score, Book of a Musical, Direction of a Musical, Choreography and Orchestrations. Mr. Miranda received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Hamilton.

Visit http://atlanticrecords.com/HamiltonMusic/ to download a HAMILTON (ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST) Lyric Book

HAM4Learning!

Fun HAMILTUNES Math/Literacy Fact: Hip-Hop is the form that makes Hamilton the musical possible. The length of the Hamilton cast album is 2h 23 m, with a total of 20,520 words, sung at approximately 144 words per minute. If Hamilton were sung at the pace of your typical Broadway shows, it would take 4 to 6 hours to get through the show!

Fun HAMILTUNES History Connection: The idea for this HAMILTUNES singalong was inspired by last school year’s 7th grade archivists at Rooftop Alternative PreK-8 School, who love all things Hamilton, so much so that they established the Hamilton Archives with the support of the Internet Archive. https://archive-it.org/collections/8717

Fun HAMILTUNES Economics Connection:
According to the New America Foundation, children with savings accounts are 7 times more likely to attend college than those without an account. The City and County of San Francisco recognizes this, and in an effort to support students becoming productive, career-ready 21st-century citizens, has established the Kindergarten to College (K2C) Program. This program gives your kindergartner a savings account containing its first $50 deposit. If you and your child add to it regularly, it can become a 12-year head start toward college tuition. http://www.sfusd.edu/en/graduation-college-and-career/financing-college/college-savings-accounts.html

The Arts & Civic Engagement:

From HEARTS AND MINDS: THE ARTS & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT, The James Irvine Foundation, April 2017

• Correlations between arts participation and the motivations and practices of civic engagement are substantial and consistent. 

• Art making experiences appear to encourage civic engagement more so than experiences as an audience member. 

• Some arts experiences in some settings generate social capital directly. 

• Arts experiences during adolescence are particularly influential. 

• People who have built identities around civic engagement often credit arts experiences as significant to their development.

From ANIMATING DEMOCRACY – Participatory Art-Making and Civic Engagement, Americans for the Arts

How arts participation strengthens and transforms communities

* Participatory art-making can strengthen communities through familiar cultural arts practices, while simultaneously bridging differences between diverse groups that come together around their common artistic passion.

* Participatory art-making activities can revitalize neglected city spaces and activate public plazas, parks, and underused facilities. 

* Participatory art-making contributes to the liveliness of “creative cities;” promotes safe, inviting, and livable neighborhoods; and can also support local economic development.